Calla Lily, A Perfect Flower For Wedding Bouquets

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Calla lilies have long-petioled, basal leaves arising from a thick rhizome. The inflorescence, on a leafless flower stalk, consists of a spathe and spadix. The spathe, a large, flaring, trumpet-shaped bract, surrounds the spadix which is covered with tiny flowers.

Calla lilies average between 1 and 3 feet high and have a diameter of approximately 1 to 1 and 1/2 feet when fully grown. The Calla lily leaves are 1 1/2′ long, rich green. The green leaves of the calla lily are shaped like arrowheads and have white or silver speckles.

Tips on Growing Calla Lilies

It is easy to grow calla lilies. These plants do not generally require too much attention. Proper planting and location are about the only important things to consider when growing calla lilies. Care of calla lilies requires that they be planted in loose, well-drained soil. They prefer to be located in full sun or partial shade in warmer climates. Calla lilies are typically planted in the spring. However, wait until the threat of frost has passed and the soil has warmed sufficiently before planting calla lilies.

Calla lilies should be planted rather deep, about 4 inches for greater results, and spaced approximately a foot apart. Once planted, the area should be watered well. Calla lilies enjoy being kept moist and will also benefit from a monthly dose of fertilizer throughout the growing season.callas-in-garden

Calla Lilies Care

As with planting, there’s not too much required for the care of calla lilies other than keeping them watered and fertilized. An adequate layer of mulch around the plants will help keep the area moist and free of weeds. Calla lilies require a dormant period once flowering has ceased. During this time, you should refrain from watering as much to allow the plant to die back.

AdvertisementIf you grow calla lilies in containers, cease watering and move the plant to a dark area once the foliage has faded. Regular watering can resume within two to three months. Although calla lilies can remain in the ground year round in warmer climates, they should be lifted and stored in cooler areas.

Care of Calla Lilies Over Winter

Dig up the rhizomes in autumn, usually after the first frost, and shake off any soil. Allow them to dry out for a few days before storing the rhizomes for winter. Calla lilies should be stored in peat moss and located in a cool, dry area, preferably dark, until warmer temperatures return in spring. Likewise, you can choose to start your calla lilies indoors during late winter and transplant them outside in spring. Calla lilies can also be divided when lifted or during their dormancy period.

Growing calla lilies is easy and calla lilies care is minimal at best. Choosing to grow calla lilies in the garden or as houseplants is a great way to add color to any area. These tips on growing calla lilies will help you enjoy these lovely flowers even more.

**Please Note – Spring Planted Callas require more sun and much drier conditions that the Giant White Callas planted in fall**

Outdoor Beds
  1. Find a location where the soil drains well. If there are still water puddles 5-6 hours after a hard rain, scout out another site. Or amend the soil with the addition of organic material to raise the level 2″-3″ to improve the drainage. Peat moss, compost, ground bark or decomposed manure all work well and are widely available. Callas thrive in average soil but will not survive in soggy settings.
  2. Site your callas where they’ll receive full sun to bright filtered light.
  3. Dig holes and plant the callas shallowly, so the tops of the tubers are exposed. Look for the sides of the tubers that appears to have the most “eyes” or growing points, which look much like the eyes on a potato. Plant the tubers with the eyes facing up.
  4. After planting, water your callas to settle the soil around the tubers. Roots and sprouts will form in a few weeks, depending on soil and air temperatures. (If temperatures are still cool in your area, wait until they warm before planting. Or start your tubers indoors in a pot for earlier blooms. Callas sulk in cold soil.)
  5. Water your callas enough to keep the soil slightly damp but never enough for it to be soggy.
  6. When in bloom, feel free to cut calla lily flowers for bouquets. This will not hurt the plants and having graceful, long lasting blooms to bring indoors is one of the best reasons to grow these beauties.
  7. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place, don’t cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight and provide nourishment for next year’s show. Water as needed. Leaves may be removed when they yellow. (In cold areas, to save your calla tubers for next year, dig them after the first frost. Let the tubers air dry for several days. Then store in a cool location in paper bags or boxes filled with peat moss.)
  8. Your callas will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.
Planters, Pots, Tubs and Urns
  1. Fill your containers with good quality, well-drained soil. Almost any commercially available potting medium will work fine. Make sure there are adequate drainage holes; calla tubers must never sit in waterlogged soil or they will rot. Keep in mind the mature size of the varieties you have chosen and plan your container sizes accordingly.
  2. Feel free to mix callas with other plants in the same container. Just keep in mind that all must have the same light and water needs.
  3. Dig holes and plant the callas shallowly, so the tops of the tubers are exposed. Look for the sides of the tubers that appears to have the most “eyes” or growing points, which look much like the eyes on a potato. Plant the tubers with the eyes facing up.
  4. After planting, water your callas generously to settle the soil around the tubers. Roots and sprouts will form in a few weeks, depending on soil and air temperatures. (If temperatures are still cool in your area, wait until they warm before planting. Or start your tubers indoors in a pot for earlier blooms. Callas sulk in cold soil.)
  5. Water your callas enough to keep the soil slightly damp but never enough for it to be soggy.
  6. When in bloom, feel free to cut calla lily flowers for bouquets. This will not hurt the plants and having graceful, long lasting blooms to bring indoors is one of the best reasons to grow these beauties.
  7. After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place, don’t cut it off. The leaves will gather sunlight and provide nourishment for next year’s show. Water as needed. Leaves may be removed when they yellow. (In cold areas, to save your calla tubers for next year, dig them after the first frost. Let the tubers air dry for several days. Then store in a cool location in paper bags or boxes filled with peat moss.)
  8. Your callas will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.

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Bhaskars Farm is a informative website from were people can see and gain knowledge about vegetables, fruits, flowers, fish farming, poultry farming, medicinal plants and herb and to know better use of them.

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